Tagged: cell-signaling

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LAMP shines a light on Zika virus

Rapid and simple assays to detect infectious agents are key to tracking emerging epidemics. Chotiwan et al. describe a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) assay that detects Zika virus RNA in human biofluids such as serum...

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Reprogramming to resist

One means by which cancer cells evade therapies involves their ability to reprogram to a cell type that no longer depends on the cellular pathway being targeted by the treatments. Hormone deprivation therapies that...

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Receptor methylation controls behavior

D2 dopamine receptors are targeted by antipsychotic agents to regulate behavior. Likhite et al. found putative arginine methylation motifs in some human G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), including the D2 dopamine receptor, and in homologs...

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Fragmented communication between immune cells

Immune cells constantly circulate in the body in search of pathogens or tissue damage. Because they move autonomously, immune cell trafficking must be tightly controlled and coordinated by extracellular cues. The main signals that...

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Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

The physiological differences between males and females go far beyond reproduction; they may even include how an animal processes pain, according to a study published today (June 29) in Nature Neuroscience. “This is not...

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How a Memory Is Made

When a nasty taste makes the stomach turn, neurons in the brain’s insular cortex fire up to form a memory of the foul flavor. But only a subset of cells are involved in storing...

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An inhibitor breaks RANK

Osteoclasts are cells that break down bone; however, excessive bone loss leads to conditions such as osteoporosis. When three proteins called RANKL bind to three receptors called RANK on the osteoclasts’ surfaces, the osteoclasts...

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Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

A cellular stress pathway called the unfolded-protein-response (UPR) both activates and degrades death receptor 5 protein (DR5), which can promote or prevent cell suicide, according to a paper published in Science today (July 3). The theory...

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