Category: Biochemistry

Proteasome Activation by Small Molecules

Highlights •Identification of more than ten small-molecule proteasome activators •Proteasome activators increase degradation of model substrates •P38 MAPK inhibition increases the clearance of toxic α-synuclein aggregates Summary Drugs that increase 26S proteasome activity have...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE

Why tolerance invites resistance

Bacteria use two strategies to avoid being killed by antibiotics: resistance and tolerance. Resistance mechanisms such as destruction of a drug or modification of its target allow bacteria to grow in the presence of...

CHILD ARCHIVE

TYK2’s balancing act

Determining the biological consequences of the thousands of genetic variants that contribute to common diseases is challenging. Genetic variants that influence autoimmune diseases have been identified in the gene encoding TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2),...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE

Dynamics of a protein knot

A small fraction of proteins have an unusual conformation in which the backbone forms a knot. An example is a bacterial enzyme, TrmD, that transfers a methyl group from S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) to a...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE

Illuminating the Interactome

The completion of the human genome sequence more than a decade ago was an indisputable triumph for biomedical research. And more recently, efforts such as the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project have sought...

CHILD ARCHIVE

An inhibitor breaks RANK

Osteoclasts are cells that break down bone; however, excessive bone loss leads to conditions such as osteoporosis. When three proteins called RANKL bind to three receptors called RANK on the osteoclasts’ surfaces, the osteoclasts...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

A cellular stress pathway called the unfolded-protein-response (UPR) both activates and degrades death receptor 5 protein (DR5), which can promote or prevent cell suicide, according to a paper published in Science today (July 3). The theory...

CHILD ARCHIVE